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Women Writers Collection


Women Writers Collection is a collection of the most influential works by women written in English from the seventeenth century through the nineteenth century. Many of these titles are considered to be part of the canon of today’s feminism movement.

 
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Progress of the American Woman

By: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Fiction

Excerpt: An article, by Flora McDonald Thompson, entitled Retrogression of the American Woman, which was published in the November number of the REVIEW, contains many startling assertions, which, if true, would be the despair of philosophers. The title itself contradicts the facts of the last half century. When machinery entered the home, to relieve woman's hands of the multiplicity of her labors, a new walk in life became inevitable for her. When our grandmothers made b...

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Retie: A True Story of a Little Hunchback

By: Mattie Griffith

Fiction

Excerpt: [We are assured that the following beautiful story, written for our columns by the author of the Autobiography of a Female Slave, is in every particular strictly true; and we suspect that the children will not read it without tears in their eyes.--Eds. Independent.] I WANT to tell the children a story of a poor little slave-girl who lived and died away down South.

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The Heavy Hour at Hand

By: Lady Eleanor

Fiction

Excerpt: READER, THE heavy hour at hand, that it should not as a Thief surprize us in the night, Babylons scattering whirlwind our final or utter blow; or lest should say, There had not a Prophet been amongst them, could not refrain giving thee warning, though like rolling the restles stone, prove but labor in vain.

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Region of Litany

By: W. Bryher (Annie Winifred Ellerman)

Fiction

Excerpt: Where is the way to thee, Region of Lutany? I cried to the swallow and lark in their flight, I cried at the dawn, in the day, and the night, I cried to the cloud, and the wave, and the tree, None knew the way to thee, Mistress imperious, O thou mysterious Region of Lutany. I sought of my soul if the pathway lay there, Song vanished away, as a bird in the air, I sought if the salt of my tears was the way, I sought if in pleasure the dream-city lay, I roamed in my...

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Sojourner Truth

By: Anonymous

Fiction

Excerpt: Anecdotes of Sojourner Truth are numerous. The following relates to her experience in the Washington street-car: She was an Empire State citizen and fully conscious of her rights under de Constitution. She says: When I went into de street to ride on de cars, de conductors would not look at me fust, an' all de drivers would turn heads anoder way: make believe dey didn't see me. But I fixed 'em.

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Sojourner Truth: A Remarkable Woman

By: Anonymous

Fiction

Excerpt: A Remarkable Woman-Her Lecture Last Night-The Negro Race-Their Trials and Emancipation. Date: Jan. 21, 1869. The notice which appeared yesterday morning concerning the colored woman known as Sojourner Truth, gave promise to all who should attend her lecture at the Unitarian Church that they would see and hear a remarkable woman; and we venture to say that no one present was disappointed. Her very appearance indeed, is remarkable, and her tall and vigorous frame,...

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Strange and Wonderful News from White-Hall

By: Anna Trapnell

Fiction

Excerpt: ... Contains descriptions of Trapnell's visions, esp. those about Cromwell, whom she opposed. Written while she was imprisoned at Whitehall for two months. Strange and Wonderful NEWES FROM WHITE-HALL: OR, The Mighty Visions Proceeding From Mistris ANNA TRAPNEL, to divers Collonels, Ladies, and Gentlewomen, concerning the Government of the Com- monwealth of Englenad, Scotland, and Ireland; And Her Revelations touching his Highness the Lord Protector, and the Army.

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Sunday at the World's Fair

By: Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Fiction

Excerpt: Some of our people are already passing resolutions in their convocations and rolling up petitions to Congress asking that the World's Fair in Chicago may be closed on Sundays, and it is important that those holding opposite views should be heard.

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Tahlequah

By: Lena Harnage Adair

Fiction

Excerpt: Tahlequah. // Here's to Tahlequah with her wooded hills, // Her sparkling springs and tinkling rills, // Her rocky cliffs by ferns o'ergrown, // And her shady nooks by lovers known: // Her maidens fair and cultured dames, // And gifted sons of illustrious names. // He who drinks of the waters of these lipid [sic] springs; // Though far he may wander fond memory brings // Sweet thoughts of the village taat [sic] nestles serene, // So tranquil and lovely like an enchanted scene //

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The Adventure of the Black Lady

By: Aphra Behn

Fiction

Excerpt: THE ADVENTUREOF THE BLACK LADY. About the beginning of the last June (as near as I can remember) Bellamora came to Town from Hampshire; and was oblig'd to lodge the first Night at the same Inn where the Stage-Coach set up. The next Day she took Coach for Covent-Garden, where she thought to find Madam Brightly, a Relation of her's; with whom she design'd to continue for about half a Year undiscover'd, if possible, by her Friends iin theCountry ...

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The Arraignment

By: Lady Eleanor

Fiction

Excerpt: MARK 9. And whosoever shall offend one of these little ONES that believe in me &c. And so who should be greatest, or bear the sway; this Lesson appointed for the present, occasioned upon that dispute: Also to whom it points about a Thing, of no little weight doubtless, where declared, A milstone better hanged about his neck, be he whosoever, standing no better on his guard, (the safe-guard of no few) on whose behavior or vigilancy depends, to whose lot the Milst...

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The Ato Mic Poems of Margaret (Lucas) Cavendish

By: Margaret Cavendish

Fiction

Excerpt: To Natural Philosophers. Date: 1653. IF any Philosophers have written of these Subjects, as I make no question, or doubt, but they have, of all that Nature hath discover'd, either in meere Thought, and Spe- culation, or other waies in Observation; yet it is more then I know of: for I never read, nor heard of any English Booke[5] to Instruct me: and truly I understand no other Language;not French, although I was in France five years.Neither do I un- derstand my o...

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The British India Society

By: Maria Weston Chapman

Fiction

Excerpt: Commends this society for creating competition with slave labor and promoting the idea of freedom in India. It would seem as if a word were hardly needed, to commend this newly-formed, but most important Society, to the warmest sympathies of American abolitionists. It is, in fact, doing their work for them, by bringing the free labor of British India in direct competition with slave labor;--by silencing the captious objector to a world-wide benevolence, when he ...

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The Common Reader First Series

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: There is a sentence in Dr. Johnson's Life of Gray which might well be written up in all those rooms, too humble to be called libraries, yet full of books, where the pursuit of reading is carried on by private people. ... I rejoice to concur with the common reader; for by the common sense of readers, uncorrupted by literary prejudices, after all the refinements of subtilty and the dogmatism of learning, must be finally decided all claim to poetical honours. It de...

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The Common Reader Second Series

By: Virginia Woolf

Fiction

Excerpt: ... I rejoice to concur with the common reader; for by the common sense of readers, uncorrupted by literary prejudices, after all the refinements of subtilty and the dogmatism of learning, must be generally decided all claim to poetical honours.--DR. JOHNSON, Life of Gray ?

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The Confession and Execution of Letitia Wigington of Ratclif

By: Leticia Wigington

Fiction

Excerpt: We are fully satisfied, that the following Paper was written by this unhappy womans own hand, a while before her Death, and though at her Tryal for this horrid fact, the Evidence against her, was full, clear and undeniable, yea which is more, though she was then so ingenious to confess her self really guilty thereof, having lain so many months in Newgate, we have very great reason to judg she has been too well acquainted with that cursed crew of Popish Priests a...

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The Countess of Lincolns Nursery

By: Elizabeth Knevet Clinton

Fiction

Introduction: What a racket do Authors make about this: The Debate Over Maternal Breastfeeding in Early Modern England In the seventeenth century, the vast majority of noble- and gentlewomen employed commoners as wet nurses. This practice, in combination with rising religious conservatism, incited a socio-religious controversy about breastfeeding.

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The Cruise of the Janet Nickole Among the South Sea Island

By: Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson

Fiction

Preface: IT is always necessary to make certain elisions in a diary not meant for publication at the time of writing. For many reasons The Cruise of the Janet Nichol has been pruned rather severely. It was, originally, only intended to be a collection of hints to help my husband's memory where his own diary had fallen in arrears; consequently, it frequently happened that incidents given in my diary were re-written (to their great betterment), amplified, and used in his, ...

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The Daughter of Sion Awakened

By: Fell Fox and Margaret Askew

Fiction

Excerpt: Retells the Biblical story of human fall and salvation and predicts the Second Coming. And thou, O Tower of the Flock, the Strong Hold of the Daughter of Sion, unto thee shall it come, even the first Dominion; the Kingdom shall come to the daughter of Jerusalem, Micah 4.8.

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The Gentle Women Companion

By: Anonymous

Fiction

Excerpt: To all Young Ladies, Gentlewomen, and all Maidens whatever. I Have formerly sent forth amongst you two little books; the first called, The Ladies Directory1; the other, The Cooks Guide2, Both which have found very good Acceptance. It is near Seven years since I began to write this Book, at the desire of the Bookseller3, and earnest intreaties of very many worth Friends; unto whom I owe more than I can do for them. And when I considered the great need of such a b...

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