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Buddhist Literature Collection


Buddhist Literature Collection are works considered to be scripture or canonical works of Buddhism. The Western terms "scripture" and "canonical" are applied to Buddhism in inconsistent ways by Western scholars: for example, one authority refers to "scriptures and other canonical texts", while another says that scriptures can be categorized into canonical, commentarial and pseudo-canonical.

 
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Sanghadisesa

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: This term means involving the Community in the initial (adi) and subsequent (sesa) acts. What it refers to is the fact that the Community is the agent which initially calls on the bhikkhu who breaks any of the rules in this category to undergo the penalty (of manatta, penance, and parivasa, probation), subsequently reimposes the penalty if he does not properly carry it out, and finally lifts the penalty when he does. There are thirteen training rules here, the f...

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Aniyata

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: This term means undetermined or uncertain. The rules in this section do not determine fixed penalties, but instead give procedures by which the Community may pass judgment when a bhikkhu in uncertain circumstances is accused of having committed an offense. There are two training rules here.

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Nissaggiya Pacittiya

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The term nissaggiya, used in connection with training rules, means entailing forfeiture. Used in connection with articles, it means to be forfeited. Pacittiya is a word of uncertain etymology. The Parivara gives a didactic derivation--that it refers to letting profitable qualities fall away (patati) with a deluded mind (citta)--but the term is more likely related to the verb pacinati (pp. pacita), which means to discern, distinguish or know.

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The Silk Chapter

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Santhata, defined here as a felt blanket/rug, is a type of cloth described in the texts simply by its method of manufacture: Instead of being woven, it is made by strewing threads over a smooth surface, sprinkling them with a glue-like mixture made from boiled rice, rolling it smooth, and then repeating the process until the felt is thick and strong enough for one's purposes. Although felt made like this can be used for a number of purposes, its major use in the...

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The Bowl Chapter

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Material. In the Cullavagga (V.8.2 & V.9.1), the Buddha allows two kinds of alms bowls--made of clay and made of iron--and forbids eleven: made either of wood, gold, silver, pearl, beryl, crystal, bronze, glass, tin, lead or copper. Using the Great Standards, it has recently been decided that stainless steel bowls are allowable, but aluminum bowls not. In the time of the Buddha, clay bowls were the more common. At present, iron and steel bowls are.

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Introduction to the Patimokkha Rules

By: Venerable Thanissaro Bhikkhu

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: In recent years more and more Westerners have come into contact with Theravada Buddhist monks, and many have become curious about the rules governing the monks' life. This introduction is meant to help satisfy that curiosity by giving a brief explanation of the rationale behind the rules and their enforcement, and by providing summaries of the rules, classed according to topic. Anyone interested in more information on the rules and their interpretation may look ...

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Introduction to the Patimokkha Rules

By: Venerable Thanissaro Bhikkhu

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: In recent years more and more Westerners have come into contact with Theravada Buddhist monks, and many have become curious about the rules governing the monks' life. This introduction is meant to help satisfy that curiosity by giving a brief explanation of the rationale behind the rules and their enforcement, and by providing summaries of the rules, classed according to topic. Anyone interested in more information on the rules and their interpretation may look ...

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Virtue and Reality

By: Venerable Lama Zapa

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: The entire Dharma, teachings of the Buddha, can be divided into two categories-extensive method and profound wisdom.

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Viyagga Baddja Sutta

By: Venerable Thallale Dhammananda

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Historically this Sutta is reputed to be the result of a request made by Prince Dhiga Janu Koliya Putta to the Buddha, requesting him to advise the average lay-person who is burdened with the care of family and society in the real world of day to day living.

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Volcano

By: Venerable Sujiva

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Preface It is not an task easy to approach on such a profound topic as Insight Meditation in simple terms. But we have got to start somewhere. After some years of introducing this type of meditation, I still find a lack of introductory booklets for those without knowledge of Buddhism. Many of them are extremely technical loaded with ancient Indian terminology which words in the English vocabulary can never hope to substitute perfectly. As such I have tried to co...

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For the Stilling of Volcanoes

By: Sujiva Ven

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: It is not an take easy to approach such a profound topic as Insight Meditation in simple terms.

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Volitionan : Introduction to the Law of Kammavolitionan, Introduct...

By: Sayadaw U. Silananda

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: What is kamma? Buddha said: ?Oh monks, it is volition that I call kamma.? The popular meaning of kamma is action or doing, but as a technical term, kamma means volition or will. When you do something, there is volition behind it, and that volition, that mental effort, is called kamma. Buddha explained that, having willed, one then acts through body, speech, and mind. Whatever you do, there is some kind of kamma, mental effort, will, and volition. Volition is one...

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Dai E Zenji's Vow for Awakening

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Our only prayer is to be firm in our determination to give ourselves completely to the Buddha's Way, so t h a t no doubts arise however long the road seems to be; to be light and easy in the four parts of the body; to be strong and undismayed in body and in mind; to be free from illness and drive out both depressed feelings and distractions ; to be free from calamity, misfortune, harmful influences and obstructions; not t o seek the Truth outside o f ourselves,...

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The Vow of the 'Ten Footsteps'

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: This file is the work of Stan Rosenthal. It has been placed here, with his kind permission, by Bill Fear. The author has asked that no hard copies, ie. paper copies, are made.

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Vyagghapajja Sutta

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: In this sutta, the Buddha instructs rich householders how to preserve and increase their prosperity and how to avoid loss of wealth. Wealth alone, however, does not make a complete man nor a harmonious society. Possession of wealth all too often multiplies man's desires, and he is ever in the pursuit of amassing more wealth and power. This unrestrained craving, however, leaves him dissatisfied and stifles his inner growth. It creates conflict and disharmony in s...

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The Benefits of Walking Meditation

By: Sayadaw U. Silananda

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: At our meditation retreats, yogis practise mindfulness in four different postures. They practice mindfulness when walking, when standing, when sitting, and when lying down. They must sustain mindfulness at all times in whatever position they are in. The primary posture for mindfulness meditation is sitting with legs crossed, but because the human body cannot tolerate this position for many hours without changing, we alternate periods of sitting meditation with p...

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War and Peace

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: If you have ever read Don Quixote, you'll remember that he was fighting windmills. Everybody is doing just that, fighting windmills. Don Quixote was the figment of a writer's imagination, a man who believed himself to be a great warrior. He thought that every windmill he met was an enemy and started battling with it. That's exactly what we are doing within our own hearts and that's why this story has such an everlasting appeal. It tells us about ourselves. Write...

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What Is Buddhism

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: What is Buddhism, is it a philosophy a religion or an ethical system? Strictly speaking it is not a philosophy, for it does not contain an elaborate system of theories and facts exclusively for cognition, although it must be admitted that the Buddha has anticipated much modern speculation.

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The Future of Zen Buddhism in the West

By: Robert Aitken, Roshi

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: I have been commissioned to do a paper for the forthcoming (July, '87) conference on World Buddhism in North America that will be titled, The Zen Buddhist Movement in North America: Retrospect and Prospect. I have the first draft finished, and here are some excerpts. (The conference will be held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, and is sponsored by the Zen Lotus Society under the direction of the Korean teacher Samu Sunim.)

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What Buddhist Believe

By: Dr. K. Sri Dhammananda

BuddhaNet: Buddhist Information and Education Network document.

Excerpt: Dhammananda is a renowned Buddhist scholar of noble character and profound knowledge. For nearly fifty years, he has devoted himself to disseminating Buddhism in Malaysia. His activities have been extensive and diverse, including writing, teaching, supporting the activities of many Buddhist groups, promoting education, welfare, cultural activities and so forth.

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