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National Security Archive Collection


The National Security Archive is a non-governmental, non-profit research and archival institution located within The George Washington University in Washington, D.C.. It archives and publishes declassified U.S. government files concerning selected topics of American foreign policy. The Archive collects and analyzes the documents of many various government institutions obtained via the Freedom of Information Act. The Archive then selects documents to be published in the form of manuscripts and microfiche.

 
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Controlling the Intelligence Agencies

By: Department of National Security

Back in September, 1975, readers of the first of these columns were promised that they would not again be burdened by jottings for my memoirs. However, with the start of the third volume of First Principles, I hope I will be forgiven if I use this space to answer the question I have been often asked in the last several weeks: How do you feel about being awarded one dollar for a twenty-one month wiretap on your home telephone?...

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Wiretap Legislation : Past and Present

By: Department of National Security

The Carter administration has brought with it its own legislative package for reforming the law governing electronic surveillance. Different aspects of the same issue have been batted about for the past half century, for the invention of the telephone was shortly followed by the invention of wiretapping. And wiretapping conferred a whole new police power for the overzealous to abuse. Attempts to deal with this are not new, and if we are to understand S. 1566, it must be ...

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The First Co-Intel-Pro Damage Award : $48, 000

By: Department of National Security

The recent settlement of a COINTELPRO damage case handled by the Wisconsin Civil Liberties Union1 is an event which has brought little comment, but which carries considerable importance. The government, which until now has been fighting tooth and nail to defend lawsuits brought by victims of improper intelligence activities2, has done a turnabout and agreed to an award of $48, 000 in compensatory damages. Following issuance of a check under the provisions of the Federal ...

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Administrative Law Review

By: Department of National Security

When our nation's leaders first established the framework for the united State government, it set up a system of checks and balances to prevent any one branch of governments from over reaching its authority...

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The Honorable Dan Glickman Chairman Permanent Select Committee on ...

By: Department of National Security

I am writing with regard to the Administration's proposal to give jurisdiction to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court to approve so-called black-bag jobs ? secret searches of the homes and offices of U.S. citizens and foreign nationals in the name of national security. I commend you for holding a public hearing on this sensitive and important issue.

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Statement of Jamie S. Gorelick Deputy Attorney General before the ...

By: Department of National Security

You have asked for my views on the provision of the senate select committee on intelligence's counterintelligence bill that establishes a procedure for court orders approving physical searches conducted in the united states for foreign intelligence purposes. At the outset, let me emphasize two very important points. First, the department of justice believes, and the case law supports, that the president has inherent authority to conduct warrantless physical searches for ...

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Brief for Amici Curiae Center for National Security Studies and th...

By: Department of National Security

Amici respectfully submit this brief to the Court on the effect of the Detainee Treatment Act of 2005, which was enacted after this Court granted certiorari in this case. Amici submit that the Act does not divest this Court of jurisdiction over this case, and that the Court should proceed to a determination on the merits. Amicus Center for National Security Studies is a nonprofit, nongovernmental civil liberties organization in Washington, D.C., that was founded in 1974 ...

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Statement for the Record of Nsa Director Lt Gen Michael V. Hayden,...

By: Department of National Security

The national security agency (nsa) performs electronic surveillance to collect foreign intelligence information for the military and policymakers. As the director of central intelligence noted, nsa provides valuable intelligence to u.s. government consumers on a wide range of issues of concern to all americans, such as international terrorism, narcotics trafficking, and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. Nsa's electronic surveillance activities are subject to ...

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Senate Democratic Policy Committee Hearing an Oversight Hearing on...

By: Department of National Security

?Iraq: Project Frustration: One Newsman?s Take on How Things Went Wrong, ? Television Week, January 22, 2004 In the chill January days when Pentagon officials were mapping the blueprint for a new Iraq, a paper was circulated here in Washington proposing a free, impartial and independent Iraqi Media Network. The paper stated, ?Whilst democracy requires a free press, at the same time it requires one that is accountable to the society and the individuals within it, which it serves.?...

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Electronic Surveillance for National Security Purposes

By: Department of National Security

NA

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Tile Supreme Court in the and 6Th Case Properly Set at Rest the Co...

By: Department of National Security

NA

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Memorandum of Amicus Curiae in Opposition to the Motion by the Uni...

By: Department of National Security

The Center is a nonpartisan civil liberties organization in Washington, D.C., that was founded in 1974 to ensure that civil liberties are not eroded in the name of national security. The Center seeks to find solutions to national security problems that protect both the civil liberties of individuals and the legitimate national security interests of the government. For more than 30 years, the Center has worked to protect the Fourth Amendment rights of individuals to be fr...

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United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court

By: Department of National Security

This responds to your letter of July 16, 2002j regarding the procedures for issuance of wauants under the Porsign Intelligence Surveillance Act (BIS A).?While the FISA Court has not promulgated procedures, it does operate under stated rules. A copy of those rules is enclosed. To the extent your interest pertains to procedures feat regulate the development and preparation of FISA applications, it would be appropriate for you to direct your request to the Department of Jus...

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United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court

By: Department of National Security

This letter is in response to your correspondence of July 31, 2002. You have requested a copy of an unclassified Memorandum Opinion and two Orders entered on May 17, 2002, and concurred in by all seven of the judges who were on the United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA Court) at the time. After conferring on August 15, 2002, with tine ten judges now oh the FISA Court, as well as the past presiding judge of the FISA Court, we have all agreed, not onl...

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Domestic Intelligence and Civil Liberties

By: Kate Martin

Since September 11, domestic intelligence authorities and technical capabilities have been expanded to fight terrorism. There are calls to substitute an ?intelligence? paradigm for a ?law enforcement? paradigm in domestic counterterrorism efforts and proposals to establish a new domestic intelligence agency. While better information and analysis is needed to fight terrorism, there is reason to fear that transforming domestic counterterrorism primarily into an intelligenc...

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Human Rights

By: Department of National Security

History has repeatedly demonstrated (he dangers of allowing governments to secretly collect intelligence on their own people. When government authority extends beyond law enforcement?investigating criminal activity?it has inevitably been followed by abuses. A key lesson learned from the domestic intelligence abuses before the mid-1970s was the necessity for a wall between law enforcement and intelligence in order to protect civil liberties. Careful lines were drawn betwe...

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Statement of Morton H. Halperin, Chair, Advisory Board, And Kate M...

By: Department of National Security

Thank you mr. Chairman and vice-chairman for the opportunity to testify today on behalf of the center for national security studies. The center is a civil liberties organization, which for 30 years has worked to ensure that civil liberties and human rights are not eroded in the name of national security. The center is guided by the conviction that our national security must and can be protected without undermining the fundamental rights of individuals guaranteed by the b...

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United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court Washington, D.C.

By: Department of National Security

I am writing in response to your request that I provide the Committee on the Judiciary with copies of the orders and opinions issued in the matter referenced in Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales?letter to you, dated January 17, 2007. As the presiding judge of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISC), I have no objection to this material being made available to the Committee. However, the Court's practice is to refer any requests for classified information to...

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The Honorable Colleen Kollar-Kotelly Presiding Judge U.S. Foreign ...

By: Department of National Security

Attorney General Gonzales revealed today that the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court issued orders on January 10, 2007 authorizing the government to engage in electronic surveillance of communicaiions into or out of the United States by terrorism suspects, subject to approval ofthe Court. I enclose a copy of the letter he sent to us and also note that the Department of Justice briefed the media on these matters at 2:30 this afternoon.

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I Am Writing to Express My Strong Support for Section 709 of H. R....

By: Department of National Security

I am writing to express my strong support for section 709 of H.R. 4299, the Intelligence Authorization Act for Ficcal Year 1995, as passed by the senate on August 12, 1994. This section would amend the Foreign intelligence Surveillance Act (FisA) to include physical searches undertaken for foreign intelligence purposes.

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